The American Disease

January 20th, 2019

The group of white, Catholic boys who mocked the Native Americans outside the Lincoln Memorial this week, might be expelled. When you watch the video, that seems appropriate, to say the least. The Catholic Diocese in Kentucky says there will be action taken against the group, wearing MAGA hats and in DC to protest the anniversary of Roe v Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that gave women autonomy over their bodies.

The Native Americans were in DC to celebrate Indigenous Peoples March, coincidentally the same weekend as the “Right To Life” protests, for the most part organized by religious groups such as the Catholic Churches of America. The irony, however, is too thick to just brush away.

The Catholic Church, which for decades has shuffled sexual predators around from parish to parish, professes to care about the unborn, that is until they are born and then sodomized or raped by priests and bishops. The church, ignoring the most obvious fix to this obscenity still refuses to allow women to become priests or normal married men to become clergy. And then they pass this sick misogyny on to their flock.

So when this group of boys attack this indigenous American, a 64-year old Vietnam veteran no less, should we be surprised? The Catholic Church is broken, and their leaders corrupt. We can punish these young men, but the sick system that produced them churns on.

Chip Franklin

Franklin is a 25 year veteran of talk radio, beginning his career in Washington DC during Clinton’s first term. He currently hosts the afternoon show at KGO radio, San Francisco. In addition, Chip is an award-winning filmmaker, comedian, and scribe, garnering seven Edward R Murrow awards, including the National Murrow award for writing. He’s also won The New York Festival honors for his unconventional coverage of The Democratic and Republican conventions, as well as more than 30 AP awards for broadcasting, and numerous appearances on ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, and CNN. He has appeared at over 500 colleges and universities and more than a hundred Fortune 1000 companies as a speaker, comedian, and media consultant. Marc Fisher, senior editor at the Washington Post says, “Chip adds irony to a medium that rarely trusts its audience to get the joke.” He is however, a mediocre dancer.
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