The Right To (My) Life

October 14th, 2017

When does life begin? That’s a question for the ages. Some say life begins at conception, others say life begins at birth. Newt Gingrich says life begins after he divorces a cancer-ridden wife. The point is, no one knows, but that doesn’t stop anti-abortion groups from pretending they do.

It’s no coincidence that the current production of “The Handmaid’s Tale” is attracting viewers and garnering awards. Margaret Atwood’s dystopian vision, where women exist only as sex-toys and baby machines, sounds like it was lifted from the GOP convention platform. Seriously though, with the draconian technology available today, and the Breitbart political mind set in Washington, well, maybe Atwood was on to something.

Science has always baffled Right-to-Lifers; zealots who care more about a zygote than the same batch of cells twelve months later, when their mothers can’t feed them or find health insurance. Where “we” see evolutionary progress, “they” see Noah’s Ark and the Flintstones. They claim life begins at conception, but many of their minions advocate executing minors as young as thirteen.  And their “abortion after birth” philosophy, where God has empowered them to do His work, has more than just a pulse after Trump’s assent. You can hear it in the alt-right, anti-gay movement, as well as in the racist rants of the current POTUS.

Donald Trump weighing in on the origins of life? I can only imagine how that Tweet would read. But to be fair, he has been honest on his feelings about the pussy.

This is a pivotal moment for woman. Allowing Trump to wade into any meaningful, philosophical debate is like floating a turd in a swimming pool. You can’t take your eyes off it, and you’re afraid to go back in.

Chip Franklin

Franklin is a 25 year veteran of talk radio, beginning his career in Washington DC during Clinton’s first term. He currently hosts the afternoon show at KGO radio, San Francisco. In addition, Chip is an award-winning filmmaker, comedian, and scribe, garnering seven Edward R Murrow awards, including the National Murrow award for writing. He’s also won The New York Festival honors for his unconventional coverage of The Democratic and Republican conventions, as well as more than 30 AP awards for broadcasting, and numerous appearances on ABC, CBS, FOX, NBC, and CNN. He has appeared at over 500 colleges and universities and more than a hundred Fortune 1000 companies as a speaker, comedian, and media consultant. Marc Fisher, senior editor at the Washington Post says, “Chip adds irony to a medium that rarely trusts its audience to get the joke.” He is however, a mediocre dancer.
See more from

Inside the Beltway